The “gorge”-ous Partnachklamm and Happy 4th of July!

by Heidi Obermeyer

Happy 4th of July everyone! I’m feeling extra patriotic this year- absence really does make the heart grow founder, and particularly when you’re often asked to explain your country’s not-so-awesome decisions with reasons why it is awesome despite its mishaps. I continue to be more and more impressed with American systems and attitudes, even with our flaws- what a unique and wonderful country we’ve created! Great work team. Let’s do our best to keep it up.

Although I will be grilling tonight with the other Yankees in my apartment complex, I don’t have any stories from that yet, so I’m going to share some pictures from Taryn’s visit last week and the jaw-dropping gorge that we visited. Of course, a train trip away from Munich wouldn’t really be an adventure without a coffee and pastry for the arduous journey.

Munich, Germany

And then once we got there… the gorge people. It was… gorgeous, if I have to pun it up in one word. It really requires panoramic pictures to potray the full scope of the place, so here’s one to start us off:

Partnachklamm, Germany

The Partnachklamm (that’s the German name of the gorge) is located near Garmisch Partnachkirchen, the site of the Winter Olympics way back in ye olde days of the Nazis. Check out this fancy ski jump (still used today, hence its appearance of having met modern safety standards).

Garmisch-Partnachkirchen, Germany

And, of course, the Nazis needed to give everyone unrealistic expectations for the human form, which somehow always seem to include a very square jawline. And nose. Whatever. Those bastards were crazy.

Garmisch-Partnachkirchen, Germany

Anyway, back to the important part- the gorge! It’s about a 40 minute walk from the train station through town (which, in keeping with Bavarian tradition, is of course beautiful and full and geraniums), past the ski jump, and up a pretty well marked path. If you’re feeling lazy, you can take a horse-drawn wagon up the path, but it’s not really necessary.

Partnachklamm, Germany

It’s 3 euro to get in, and then you walk for anywhere between 20-30 minutes (in my estimation) to get through the whole thing, including LOTS of picture taking. And it’s beautiful every step of the way.

Partnachklamm, Germany

During some parts where it got a little hairy for the people who carved the path you’re going through rock tunnels and peaking out at the water through big holes every once in a while. It makes the water look really nice and blue, which I enjoyed.

Partnachklamm, Germany

We went just as the sun had really started to come out for the day, so there was great lighting throughout our whole walk. I love not being able to hear what anyone’s saying in a canyon because the sound of the water fills up the whole space.

Partnachklamm, Germany

It was perhaps one of my favorite things I’ve visited in Germany, although I think I say that after every hike or trip into the mountains around here. It’s like a fairytale every time I go- super green, full of flowers, and the views are astounding. Bavaria, I love you.

Partnachklamm, Germany

If you’d like, you can read more about the Partnachklamm by clicking here. For now, I’m off to get some food ready for grilling tonight and to do some reading (I just bought this book– so far it’s really interesting and readable for such a scholarly topic). Happy Independence Day, America!

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